[Video] 3D Printed Liberator Pistol Successfully Printed on Low End 3D Printer, Costing Less Than $1800

May 20 2013
by GSL Staff
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By now I’m sure most people who follow gun news are aware of the Liberator pistol plans, produced by the Texas company, Defense Distributed. The company has produced plans, which can be downloaded online, that allow a 3d printer to produce all of the parts (except the firing pin) for producing a very simple, single shot gun.

The plans have been downloaded hundreds of thousands of time from the DD website and on torrent sharing sites. Noticing the activity, the United States State Department actually stepped in and shut down the DD site where the files were originally hosted, but they are still readily available on torrent networks.

The plans even resulted in the first 3d gun being printed in the UK, showing how the new technology could bypass strict gun laws in places like the UK and Australia.

Named the Liberator pistol (after the disposable pistols the United States dropped behind enemy lines during WW2 for the use of occupied allies), the firearm is extremely simple and not very durable compared to commercially available guns. 3d printers are also not very affordable yet, and the system used by DD to produce their prototype costs nearly $10,000.

However, that cost gap is being overcome by others who are printing their own Liberators.

According a Forbes report, a Lulzbot 3d printer, a device that can be had for under $2,000, has been used to produce a surprisingly durable Liberator. The gun survived nine shots of .380 ammo and could have possibly done more. The maker of the affordable version, an engineer simply going by “Joe”, told Forbes he made his version a little stronger simply by using a more durable plastic in the 3d printer and reinforcing the design with metal, instead of plastic pins.

One thing is clear. 3d gun technology is here to stay and we will begin seeing more and more remixed and improved versions of this design. The seed has been planted. You can’t stop the signal.

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