TSA Wants to Purchase 3.5 Million Rounds of .357 Sig and Lease a NJ Shooting Range…

August 21 2013
by GSL Staff
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TSAAs if having DHS, DEA, ATF, FBI, and your state/local law enforcement officers armed to the teeth isn’t enough, now the TSA wants in on the action.

According to an FBO.gov request, the TSA is seeking to lease time on a range “within 20 miles of New York LaGuardia Airport without crossing a bridge and/or incurring a toll.”

Well at least they are looking out for taxpayers to make sure government agents aren’t paying a toll…to the government…anyway, moving along.

According to the request, the estimated number of rounds fired at the range will be 490,200 per year. That number goes along nicely with the next number we’re going to look at.

According to another request, the TSA is looking to secure 3.5 million rounds of .357 Sig training ammunition. Sorry, that’s an exaggeration, it’s actually 3.454 million rounds.

One could easily imagine the TSA establishing a west coast training deport in addition to the one in the Northeast. If that happened you could easily imagine 1 million rounds per year being fired.

In 2012, just 11 years after being established, the TSA had an estimated budget of $7.6 billion (with a b). The TSA is currently under control of the DHS, which raised its own eyebrows with ammo purchases over the last few months, with multi-year contracts including billions (still with a b) of rounds over a multi-year period.

According to Red Flag,

The federal agency’s huge bullet buy could signal an expansion of its controversial Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response (VIPR) program, where teams of armed TSA officers patrol railroad stations, bus stations, ferries, car tunnels, ports, subways, truck weigh stations, rest areas, and special events.

VIPR teams currently conduct around 8,000 operations a year. As well as providing security at transport hubs, VIPR teams are now being used to keep tabs on fans at sporting events.

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