Chicago and New York, Cities With Strictest Gun Laws in the Nation, Having Huge Violence Problem This Year

June 5 2013
by GSL Staff
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timesWhen you think of strict gun control laws you think of the cities of Chicago and New York. In both cities guns are so highly regulated that they may as well be considered illegal for your average working class guy or gal on the street.

However, despite the inability of the law abiding citizenry to acquire firearms, that doesn’t seem to be stopping the criminal class.

In the past couple of weeks both cities have shown an eruption in gun violence. Over Memorial Day weekend in Chicago 6 people were killed and 23 wounded in various shootings. This wasn’t a mass shooting either, most of these were individual incidents, according to the Sun Times.

During the first weekend in June, in New York City, 6 people were killed and 19 wounded in various shootings.

According to the Daily Caller,

Twelve people were shot in Brooklyn, eight in the Bronx, four in Queens and one in Manhattan. Four people were shot in four different shootings in Brooklyn on Sunday night alone, The Associated Press reported.

Can we please look at the empirical evidence here? Some might look at numbers like these, and then compare them to other cities, like Austin, TX (and others) which have high rates of firearm ownership, but very low violent crime rates, and say that more guns in the hands of citizens actually reduces crime. At minimum can’t we agree that stricter gun laws don’t reduce violent crime? Is it even an argument at this point? Doesn’t the data speak for itself?

When will politicians stop attacking inanimate objects, roll up their sleeves and start tackling the socioeconomic problems that are at the heart of day to day violence and mental health problems which are at the heart of mass murders? Probably never, because it’s much easier to put together a couple of sound bites decrying gun ownership than it is to actually make real improvements.

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