Eric Holder’s Justice Dept. Files Sup. Court Case Which Would Allow Treaties to Trump Constitution

November 1 2013
by GSL Staff
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According to Joel Gehrke at the Washington Examiner, Eric Holder’s Department of Justice is advancing a case in the Supreme Court which could negatively affect US sovereignty.

The DoJ contends that international treaties allow the federal government to prosecute cases which they normally would not have jurisdiction over if the US is involved in an international treaty on the matter in question.

This is obviously a danger to states’ rights and the sovereignty of the United States as a whole.

According to the Examiner piece,

The Judicial Crisis Network’s Carrie Severino said the Bond case could have ramifications for many other issues.

“If the administration is right, the treaty power could become a backdoor way for the federal government to do everything from abolishing the death penalty nationwide, to outlawing homeschooling, to dramatically curtailing the states’ rights to regulate abortion,” she told the Washington Examiner.

Of course, for those of us in the gun community, it’s hard not to look at this case along with the UN Arms Treaty which was recently signed by Secretary of State John Kerry.

As it stands right now, the Senate has soundly rejected the treaty and there appears to be little chance of it being ratified anytime in the near future. However, treaties, unlike bills introduced by members of Congress, do not have to be reintroduced during each new session of Congress. This means the Arms Treaty could sit in limbo for years or decades until there is a more favorable Senate that is willing to pass it.

Combine that face with the DoJ case and you start to see some possible issues for the right to bear arms in the coming years.

Fortunately, some high profile lawmakers are speaking out on the case, including Texas Senator Ted Cruz.

Cruz addressed the case during a speech given to the Heritage Foundation (see video below).

Cruz specifically mentions that the case, if it went the wrong way, could be used to curtail any and all individual rights, including the right to bear arms.

This is certainly one to keep an eye on. The case is Bond v. United States.

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