BREAKING: John Kerry Will Sign UN Arms Treaty TOMORROW

September 24 2013
by GSL Staff
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The Associated Press is reporting that Secretary of State John Kerry will sign the United Nations Arms Treaty on Wednesday this week.

It is feared and predicted by many gun rights groups and advocates that the treaty, if ratified, could open up the US gun market to international regulation.

According to a letter written by CCRKBA Chairman Alan Gotlieb,

The uncertainty begins in the discussion of small arms. Where will the regulations on our small arms start, and where will they stop? They are even trying to include ammunition regulations in the Arms Trade Treaty! Will the United Nations try to impose international licensing requirements, an international registry, or international?

The last negotiations for an Arms Trade Treaty took place in July 2012, just four months before the Presidential election. Obama did not want to take a big stance for global gun control just months before his re-election but now he has made it clear he is for total gun control. He also told voters he would not be re-visiting negotiations for an Arms Trade treaty but here we are.

Since his re-election it has become clearer than ever what is at the top of his agenda; taking our guns away! The Obama Administration has been exploiting tragedies since the election to push gun control at the city, state, federal, and now GLOBAL level.

Our Senate took a stance before the Presidential election when 51 of them wrote Obama a letter saying they would not support an Arms Trade Treaty. We must let our entire U.S. Senate know we do not support international gun control. They must not ratify this international treaty.

Despite Kerry’s pending signature, don’t panic just yet. The treaty must also be ratified by the Senate, which is unlikely to happen in the immediate future.

In fact, in March, the Senate voted to keep the US out of the arms treaty by a vote of 53-46.

Treaties require a 2/3 majority vote by the Senate in order to be ratified, however, unlike regular bills, treaties do not have to be reintroduced for each session of Congress. This means the treaty could sit in committee until the Senate is more likely to pass it after future elections.

One particularly troubling part of the treaty is the process for amending it. Amending the treaty only requires a 3/4 majority vote of member nations. This means that US gun rights could be in the hands of other nations who take part in the treaty in the future, making the treaty a slippery slope.

As it stands, the treaty does not regulate gun ownership in the United States, but could immediately affect the availability and cost of foreign made guns and ammo if ratified. Also, as mentioned, the amendment process leaves the US open to having new gun control regulations imposed on it by a 3/4 majority vote of member nations.

The treaty will not take effect until at least 50 member nations sign and ratify it.

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