Apparently Those Popular PlumCrazy Polymer Lowers Might be Illegal…

March 31 2014
by GSL Staff
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The polymer lower market seems to be treacherous waters in recent days. Following the ATF’s raid of ARES Armor due to the legality of a polymer 80% lower, we’re now seeing reports that the PlumCrazy polymer lowers that were extremely popular a couple of years ago might be illegal.

Steve Johnson over at The Firearm Blog reported that an ATF letter provided to him made the following notes about the lowers,

During the examination of the submitted AR- 15 type firearm receiver section (serial number RM00501 ), FTB also found that both the height and depth of the serial number markings are acceptable and thus compliant with§ 478.92. With respect to the adequacy of the attachment of the insert for this frame, the FTB evaluation revealed that the serial number consisted of a thin sheet of metal-like material and was attached to the surface of the embedded metal insert. This serial number was easily removed when a hammer and screw driver were used to peel the sheet off of the metal insert. This action took approximately 1 minute and caused no damage to the receiver. (See enclosed photos depicting the removal of the serial number insert.)

…the method used to attach the serial number insert (serial number RM00501) on the partial receiver sample is not compliant with Federal Law.

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Not good considering who knows how many thousands or tens of thousands of these lowers were sold during the height of their popularity.

There is no mention of any action against anyone owning one of these lowers taking place that I’ve heard about, but it’s certainly something worthy of keeping an eye on.

This also raises the question about the legality of the serial number plate on other brands of polymer lowers.

Unlike the 80% lowers at the center of the ARES Armor issue, these lowers were sold as firearms so there would be 4473 Forms associated with these purchases.

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