[Video] Old School vs. New School – Hickok45 Compares the BAR to the SCAR-17

July 4 2014
by GSL Staff
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We got a little “old school meets new school” action from the Hickok45 this week. Everyone’s favorite giant lead slinger thought it would be cool to compare two battle rifles in .30 calibers (.30-06 for the BAR and 7.62×51/.308 for the SCAR). Note, the BAR in this video is the M1918 Browning Automatic Rifle, not the newer rifles that also got the BAR name.

The rifles do have some striking similarities and also some glaring differences. It’s very interesting to see these battle rifles from different ages being shot side by side, especially by an experienced shooter like Hickok45.

Here is a little background about each gun via Wikipedia. First, the SCAR,

The Special Operations Forces Combat Assault Rifle (SCAR) is a modular rifle made by FN Herstal (FNH) for the United States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to satisfy the requirements of the SCAR competition. This family of rifles consist of two main types. The SCAR-L, for “light”, is chambered in the 5.56×45mm NATO cartridge and the SCAR-H, for “heavy”, fires 7.62×51mm NATO. Both are available in Long Barrel and Close Quarters Combat variants.

The FN SCAR systems completed low rate initial production testing in June 2007. After some delays, the first rifles began being issued to operational units in April 2009, and a battalion of the US 75th Ranger Regiment was the first large unit deployed into combat with 600 of the rifles in 2009. The US Special Operations Command has currently cancelled their purchase of the Mk 16 SCAR-L and are planning to remove the rifle from their inventory by 2013. However, they will purchase the Mk 17 SCAR-H version, and also plan to purchase 5.56 mm conversion kits for the Mk 17, supplanting the loss of the Mk 16. The SCAR was one of the competing weapons in the Individual Carbine competition which aimed to find a replacement for the M4 Carbine.

And the BAR,

The Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) was a family of United States automatic rifles (or machine rifles) and light machine guns used by the United States and numerous other countries during the 20th century. The primary variant of the BAR series was the M1918, chambered for the .30-06 Springfield rifle cartridge and designed by John Browning in 1917 for the U.S. Expeditionary Corps in Europe as a replacement for the French-made Chauchat and M1909 Benet-Mercie machine guns.

The BAR was designed to be carried by advancing infantrymen, slung over the shoulder or fired from the hip, a concept called “walking fire”—thought to be necessary for the individual soldier during trench warfare. However in practice, it was most often used as a light machine gun and fired from a bipod (introduced in later models). A variant of the original M1918 BAR, the Colt Monitor Machine Rifle, remains the lightest production automatic gun to fire the .30-06 Springfield cartridge, though the limited capacity of its standard 20-round magazine tended to hamper its utility in that role.

Although the weapon did see some action in World War I, the BAR did not become standard issue in the U.S. Army until 1938 when it was issued to squads as a portable light machine gun. The BAR saw extensive service in both World War II and the Korean War and saw some service early in the Vietnam War. The U.S. Army began phasing out the BAR in the late 1950s and was without a portable light machine gun until the introduction of the M60 machine gun in 1957 and later M249 Squad Automatic Weapon in the mid-1980s.

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