This Invention by a Teacher is Super Simple and Could Actually Slow Down a School Shooter

June 12 2014
by GSL Staff
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While I still think the best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun (which could come in the form of armed resource officers, armed private security, or armed staff), it’s always good to take additional precautions to protect children while they’re at school.

A simple, relatively inexpensive invention by a teacher might actually be able to save some lives.

Most active shooter training for teachers includes barricading classroom doors in some way. Usually this is accomplished through place heavy objects against the door or tying up the door’s opening mechanism with a belt, shoe string, etc. This solutions are less than ideal.

Here is the idea one teacher had, via MyFox8,

“The Sleeve” is a 12-gauge carbon steel case that fits around the door’s closer arm, securing the door from the inside. The Sleeve can withstand more than 550 foot-pounds of pressure, making it nearly impossible to open from the outside.

Daniel Nitzel, a teacher at West Middle School in Muscatine, got the idea from the school’s active shooter training.

“We were instructed to tie a belt or a cord around the closer arm. It seemed like a logical way to secure a door without having to go into the hallway, [but] it took us a long time to get a cord, stand on a chair, and tie a knot, which could potentially be the most important tie of your life.” said Nitzel.

“I can tell you in our training, all five rooms that the teachers were trained in; the doors were breached, the cords were ripped, and the officer who was portraying the active shooter came in and killed all of us,” Nitzel said.

Pretty cool idea in my opinion. While I’d still like to have an armed teacher on the other side of that door, if you can prevent the suspect from getting to you, that’s certainly a start.

If you’re interested in The Sleeve you can find more information on Fighting Chance Solutions’ website.

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