Stevie Wonder Says He Now Refuses to Perform in “Stand Your Ground” States

July 16 2013
by GSL Staff
Share This Post
      

Muscician Stevie Wonder has announced will no longer perform in states that have “stand your ground” self defense laws.

Here is a transcript of the statements made by Wonder in the above video, recorded during a concert on Sunday in Quebec City.

“The truth is that—for those of you who’ve lost in the battle for justice, wherever that fits in any part of the world—we can’t bring them back. What we can do is we can let our voices be heard. And we can vote in our various countries throughout the world for change and equality for everybody. That’s what I know we can do.

“And I know I’m not everybody, I’m just one person. I’m a human being. And for the gift that God has given me, and from whatever I mean, I decided today that until the Stand Your Ground law is abolished in Florida, I will never perform there again. As a matter of fact, wherever I find that law exists, I will not perform in that state or in that part of the world.

“Because what I do know is that people know that my heart is of love for everyone. When I say everyone I mean everyone. As I said earlier, you can’t just talk about it, you have to be about it. We can make change by coming together for the spirit of unity. Not in destruction, but in the perpetuation of life itself.”

Over 30 states have “stand your ground” laws, “castle doctrines” or use case law supporting no duty to retreat during self defense situations.

According to Wikipedia,

Many states have some form of Stand Your Ground law. Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming have adopted Castle Doctrine statutes, and other states (Iowa, Virginia, and Washington) have considered “Stand Your Ground” laws of their own.

Some of the states that have passed or are considering “stand your ground” laws already implement “stand your ground” principles in their case law. Indiana and Georgia, among other states, already had “stand your ground” case law and passed “stand your ground” statutes due to possible concerns of the case law being replaced by “duty to retreat” in later court rulings. Other states, including Washington and Virginia, have “stand your ground” in their case law but have not adopted statutes; West Virginia had a long tradition of “stand your ground” in its case law before codifying it as a statute in 2008. These states did not have civil immunity for self-defense in their previous self-defense statutes.

Disqus Comments

comments powered by Disqus