[Video] DC Permit Process, Cop Says 2nd Amendment is For “When the British Are Coming”

November 13 2014
by GSL Staff
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Let’s see, do I make a lewd joke about British porn based on the cop’s comments in this story or do I take the high road and just get right into why The District of Columbia’s new carry permit process is an absolute joke.

I guess we’ll take the high road like we always do here (but please feel free to use your imagination on the British jokes).

Investigative reporter Emily Miller, who literally wrote the book on gun rights in our nation’s capitol (see Emily Gets Her Gun), who is now a reporter with My Fox DC, attempts to obtain a permit to carry in Washington and the results are about what was expected.

What she found (and what most people already assumed) is that it’s pretty much impossible to get a permit to carry in DC. DC is currently a “may issue” district, which means you must prove you need a permit and it’s up to the authorities to decide if that need is legit.

Miller tried to argue that since she lives, works, and travels in one of the highest violent crime areas in the country (Washington DC) that she needs a permit. However, the officer she spoke with said that wasn’t good enough.

Here are some of the comments from the officer she dealt with:

“You need to meet two criteria,” Agurs explained. “First that your life is in danger, your family or your property, or you have the type of business you carry large sums of money, jewelry. Under those circumstances, you can get a carry permit in DC.”

“To prove my life is in danger?” I asked. “Obviously there is a rising crime rate and a high rate of murders and sexual assaults in D.C. — is that enough to say I want this for self-defense?”

“You have to prove you need concealed carry as opposed to just wanting one,” he replied.

Prove a need for a constitutional right? That’s what D.C.’s new law says.

The application that Agurs gave me said that living and working in a high crime city is not enough to get a carry permit. I read further down where it says that it has to be “a special danger to your life.”

What’s the difference between a regular danger — like getting raped and murdered on the street — and a special danger? You have to prove you are being targeted.

“Do I have to give evidence?” I asked.

“Yes ma’am,” said Agurs.

“I was a victim of a home invasion. And I’ve gotten a threat against me. Do I just give the police records?” I asked.

“Yes, ma’am,” he said.

Perhaps the worst comment came when a police employee argues that the Second Amendment was written during a time when “the British were coming” (#BritishPornJokes). Of course anyone who passed American History (and paid a little bit of attention) knows, the Bill of Rights was ratified well after the Revolutionary War. Well, except that guy.

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