[Video] Arlington, TX City Council Takes Steps to Limit Gun Carry and Passing Out of Pocket Constitutions

April 23 2014
by GSL Staff
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Screen Shot 2014-04-23 at 3.31.30 AMWow, it’s not everyday that a city council votes to restrict both the First and Second Amendments in one session! If they had thrown some kind of involuntary search ordinance in there they could have been 3/3 on violating our most important rights all in one night! Maybe next time.

The Arlington, TX city council took the first step in passing two local ordinances, both aimed at limiting the actions of a local open carry group.

The first ordinance would forbid firearms or “simulated weapons” at any sort of government building or meeting. Yeah, as far as we can tell that means anything that looks like a gun.

The second ordinance would limit the ability of people to pass out literature in public. In this case, the measure is directly targeting Open Carry Texas’s efforts to pass out pocket constitutions to people (kind of ironic considering the unconstitutional issues being discussed here).

Debate got pretty heated during the debate. It did look like pro gun rights supporters had an overwhelming majority present though.

According to NBC DFW,

“We’ve seen many other individuals and organizations do the exact same thing,” said [Kory Watkins, of Open Carry Texas]. “When we’re on an open carry walk and people ask for our information, we exchange it. It’s a mutual agreement between two citizens and we should have every right to do that.”

He also believes he should have been allowed to carry his black powder revolver into a recent city council meeting. Instead, he was stopped by police.

“Under Texas state law, it’s not counted as a firearm or anything of that nature,” said Watkins. “It’s actually an antique. So under the law, I’m allowed to bring it in there.”

State law prohibits people with concealed carry permits to bring a concealed firearm into a public meeting. Arlington police say the laws are more fuzzy on whether an old-fashioned gun is considered a firearm. During that particular incident, though, they say their officers had legitimate safety concerns because to them it looked like a loaded, working weapon.

The proposed ordinance would put a blanket ban on all weapons and “simulated weapons” at public meetings.

For people that think Texas is the be all/end all capital of guns, issues like this still plague the Lone Star State in many areas and Texas is one of only a handful of states that doesn’t allow open carry, licensed or unlicensed.

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