[Video] TX Senator Proposed National Concealed Carry Reciprocity Bill

January 14 2014
by GSL Staff
Share This Post
      

Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) has introduced a bill in the Senate that would allow for nationwide reciprocity between states on the issue of concealed carry.

The senator’s office put out the following press release:

WASHINGTON—U.S. Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) today introduced the Constitutional Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2014, which would allow individuals with concealed carry privileges in their home state to exercise those rights in any other state that also has concealed carry laws. The legislation is cosponsored by U.S. Sens. Thune (R-SD), Vitter (R-LA), Graham (R-SC), Boozman (R-AR), Inhofe (R-OK), Crapo (R-ID), Burr (R-NC), Cochran (R-MS), Johanns (R-NE), Enzi (R-WY), Moran (R-KS), Roberts (R-KS), and Portman (R-OH).

“This bill strengthens two of our nation’s most fundamental rights, ensuring law-abiding gun owners can lawfully carry their weapons into like-minded states, while respecting the rights of states to adopt laws that are best-suited for the people of that state. This is an important affirmation of the Second Amendment and one that has been a top priority of law-abiding gun owners in Texas for some time. It is time to get this done.

The Constitutional Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2014 would treat state-issued concealed-carry permits like drivers’ licenses, allowing law-abiding citizens with concealed carry privileges to concealed-carry in any other states that also permit it by law.

I’m kind of torn on this one. On one hand, I’d love to not have to worry about if the reciprocity agreements between states are current and spend time getting multiple carry permits from multiple states in order to be able to carry in more places.

On the other hand, the state’s rights and small government part of my brain totally disagrees with getting the federal government involved in firearms carry at all.

Currently state’s have no obligation to turn over their list of permit holders to the federal government. How could that change with this bill?

Given the current makeup of the senate I don’t think this bill will be moving anytime soon, but it does open up an interesting debate.

Disqus Comments

comments powered by Disqus