Sheriff Announces He Will NOT Challenge Cali. Court Ruling on Carry Permits, “Shall Issue” Moves Forward

February 23 2014
by GSL Staff
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Flag_of_CaliforniaWow. I know this seems like a mundane court case that came out of nowhere for people who live outside of California, but this is pretty huge. As I’m sure you’re aware, last week, an appeals court ruled that applicants for carry permits do not need “good cause” to receive a permit. That was a pretty huge ruling in an of itself, however it was expected the ruling would be appealed by the San Diego Sheriff and may not have withstood an “en banc” review of the ruling.

However, that review/appeal is not going to happen! According to SFGate,

In an unexpected action, the San Diego County sheriff said Friday he will not seek a rehearing of last week’s federal appeals court ruling that would eliminate most local restrictions on concealed-weapons permits in California.

Although state Attorney General Kamala Harris or the court itself could still intervene, the decision by Sheriff Bill Gore increases the possibility of a proliferation of handguns on the streets of San Francisco and other urban areas that now severely restrict them.

“We’re concerned,” said Deputy City Attorney Christine Van Aken. If the ruling stands, she said, “San Francisco officials are going to have to grant more permits and won’t really have the discretion to make judgments about whether people should have concealed weapons.”

The state of California could get involved in the case and request further review of the ruling. However, if no further action is taken that means California is on its way to become a “shall issue” state in regards to carry permits.

I could really see this going either way at this point. There are still several legal hurdles to overcome before this thing is said and done, but we are certainly moving in the right direction here. According to the SFGate article, there are a few possible options for the anti-gunners remaining,

The state was not a party to the case. But with a California law at stake, Harris could request intervention from the full court and, if approved, could request a rehearing before an 11-judge panel, an action that would require a majority vote of the court’s 27 judges. If allowed into the case, she could also appeal any unfavorable decision to the Supreme Court.

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