AZ Governor Jan Brewer Signs Bill Making it Easier to Get Silencers, Short Barreled Rifles, AOWs

April 25 2014
by GSL Staff
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Just a day after vetoing two bills that many considered pro-gun, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer signed into law a bill that will make it easier for Arizona residents to obtain items that are regulated by the National Firearms Act.

These items include silencers, automatic firearms, short barreled rifles/shotguns and firearms that are classified as “any other weapon” (aka AOW).

The transfer paperwork for these items currently requires a sign off from your local chief law enforcement officer (aka CLEO, usually a sheriff or police chief) in order to be completed. Sometimes, anti-gun CLEOs will refuse to do these transfers. This bill will require CLEOs to sign off on transfers within 60 days if the applicant isn’t forbidden from owning firearms.

Here is some more info from NRA-ILA,

Early this morning, the Arizona Legislature adjourned its 2014 Second Regular Session. As reported yesterday, House Bill 2535, sponsored by state Representative John Kavanagh (R-23), and Senate Bill 1366, sponsored by state Senator Rick Murphy (R-21), were sent to Governor Jan Brewer (R) for her signature.

Last night, Governor Brewer signed into law House Bill 2535. This NRA-supported legislation improves the process for obtaining a chief law enforcement officer (CLEO) certification when a signoff is required for the transfer of a firearm or other item regulated by the National Firearms Act (NFA). HB 2535 requires CLEO certification to be provided within sixty days so long as the applicant is not prohibited by law from receiving the firearm or other item. The Senate passed HB 2535 on Monday by an 18 to 10 vote. The House passed HB 2535 on March 13, by a 34 to 22 vote. House Bill 2535 will go into effect on July 24.

Special thanks to Governor Brewer for signing this important legislation.

It is thought Brewer’s veto of the other two gun bills that reached her desk had to do with the way they were written rather than the content of the bills.

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