BREAKING: Illinois School Overturns Suspension of Eagle Scout Over AK-47 T-Shirt

May 15 2014
by GSL Staff
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Common sense (real common sense, not anti-gun gun nonsense common-sense) prevails!

Yesterday we reported the story about the 18 year old Illinois student who was suspended from school after he refused to remove a shirt that depicted the silhouette of an AK-47 type rifle and the words “Team AK”.

It looks like the school has come to their senses and lifted the suspension along with a full expungement of the teen’s academic record!

According to the Chicago Tribune,

Officials in Hinsdale Township High School District 86 are backtracking on the suspension of a student who wore a T-shirt depicting an AK-47 to school.

The district will remove the suspension from the record of Chris Borg, 18, a senior who wore a T-shirt depicting an AK-47 to Hinsdale Central High School on May 6, the student said. The shirt also had the words “AKteam” printed on it and the URL for a Kentucky gun club that supports gun rights.

“I’m ecstatic,” Borg said of the decision. “I’m happy. I wasn’t trying to push buttons or be provocative. I was just trying to assert my First Amendment rights.”

Original Story: Here we go again. More anti-gun hysteria in our public schools. This time it’s out of a state you might expect for such behavior – Illinois.

Chris Borg, an 18 year old senior at Hinsdale Township High School was told he either had to turn his t-shirt inside out, wear another shirt for the rest of the day, or leave school. The shirt depicted an outline of an AK-47 style rifle with the words “Team AK” on it as well as a URL for Kentuckyarmoryclub.com.

Borg left school, citing his first amendment right to free speech as the reason he refused to remove the shirt.

Now Borg, who was subsequently suspended for his refusal to change his clothing, is fighting to get the suspension removed from his record.

According to the Chicago Tribune,

Supt. Bruce Law said the T-shirt is a violation of the dress code outlined in the school’s handbook.

The handbook states that students are subject to disciplinary action when they wear clothing that “is deemed vulgar, inappropriate, unsafe or disruptive to the educational process (e.g., advertising/display of alcohol, drugs, tobacco, sexual innuendo).

Borg said he was told the T-shirt was unsafe and disruptive.

Borg goes on to point out that their history books depict firearms and even the school’s mascot, a devil, carries a pitchfork.

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